Software


ABINIT

ABINIT is a suite of programs for materials science, which implements density functional theory, using a plane wave basis set and pseudopotentials, to compute the electronic density and derived properties of materials ranging from molecules to surfaces to solids. It implements density functional theory by solving the Kohn–Sham equations describing the electrons in a material, expanded in a plane wave basis set and using a self-consistent conjugate gradient method to determine the energy minimum. Computational efficiency is achieved through the use of fast Fourier transforms, and pseudopotentials to describe core electrons. As an alternative to standard norm-conserving pseudopotentials, the projector augmented-wave method may be used. In addition to total energy, forces and stresses are also calculated so that geometry optimizations and ab initio molecular dynamics may be carried out. Materials that can be treated by ABINIT include insulators, metals, and magnetically ordered systems including Mott-Hubbard insulators.

Crispy

Crispy is a modern graphical user interface to simulate core-level spectra using semi-empirical multiplet approaches.

FEFF9

Condensed matter code for modelling x-ray and electron spectroscopies and materials properties. FEFF is an automated program for ab initio multiple scattering calculations of X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS), X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) and various other spectra for clusters of atoms. The code yields scattering amplitudes and phases used in many modern XAFS analysis codes, as well as various other properties. in FEFF9 there are several new spectroscopies which can be calculated with FEFF 9, including electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS). In addition, there are a variety of improvements. These include; (1) ab initio Debye-Waller factors; (2) improved treatment of inelastic losses; (3) an improved treatment of the core-hole interaction; and (4) more accurate treatment of crystalline systems with k-space calculation of the Green's function. FEFF9 comes with the JFEFF GUI.

OCEAN

OCEAN is a versatile package for performing first-principles calculations of core edge spectroscopy. The many-body method is based on ground-state density-functional theory (DFT) and uses the Bethe-Salpeter equation. OCEAN utilizes the programs ABINIT or QuantumESPRESSO for ground-state DFT portion of the calculations. OCEAN is capable of producing various spectra including X-ray absorption near-edge spectra (XANES), X-ray emission spectra (XES), and non-resonant inelastic X-ray scatter (NRIXS or XRS). OCEAN is the result of collaboration between the Rehr group at the University of Washington and Eric Shirley at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA).

PyMca

X-ray Fluorescence Toolkit (visualization and analysis of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence data). . The program allows both interactive and batch processing of large data sets and is particularly well suited for X-ray imaging. Its implementation of a complete description of the M shell is particularly helpful for analysis of data collected at low energies. It features, among many other things, the fundamental parameters method

Quanty

Quanty is a script language which allows the user to program quantum mechanical problems in second quantization and when possible solve these. It can be used in quantum chemistry as post Hartree-Fock or in one of the LDA++ schemes. (self consistent field, configuration interaction, coupled cluster, restricted active space, ...) The idea of Quanty is that the user can focus on the model and its physical or chemical meaning. Quanty takes care of the mathematics.